A deeper understanding of the aristotelian doctrine

But another part of us—feeling or emotion—has a more limited field of reasoning—and sometimes it does not even make use of it. Aristotle makes use of this claim when he proposes that in the ideal community each child should receive the same education, and that the responsibility for providing such an education should be taken out of the hands of private individuals and made a matter of common concern a21—7.

We at St. Like the akratic, an enkratic person experiences a feeling that is contrary to reason; but unlike the akratic, he acts in accordance with reason.

At first, Aristotle leaves open the first of these two possibilities. This sort of asymmetry must be captured in scientific explanation. Aristotle applies his method of running through the phainomena and collecting the endoxa widely, in nearly every area of his philosophy.

His reply, of course, is that nature has given us work to do, in default of which we are necessarily unhappy, and that work is to put into action the power of reason.

aristotle virtues

Aristotle makes this point in several of his works see for example De Anima a23—b7and in Ethics X. He says that pleasure completes the activity that it accompanies, but then adds, mysteriously, that it completes the activity in the manner of an end that is added on.

Again, because it is always altogether at work, nothing of it is ever left over outside of or apart from its work of thinking: it is thinking, simply.

aristotle intellectual virtues

APo 71b9—16; cf. By contrast, in Book VII Aristotle strongly implies that the pleasure of contemplation is the good, because in one way or another all living beings aim at this sort of pleasure.

Aristotle gives this answer: "such things are among particulars, and the judgment is in the act of sense-perception. A low-grade form of ethical virtue emerges in us during childhood as we are repeatedly placed in situations that call for appropriate actions and emotions; but as we rely less on others and become capable of doing more of our own thinking, we learn to develop a larger picture of human life, our deliberative skills improve, and our emotional responses are perfected.

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Aristotle (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)